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23 Great Thanksgiving Vegetable Dishes

Bring color and fresh flavor to the Thanksgiving table with your picks from these fall vegetables

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Green Beans with Chanterelles and Cipollini

Chanterelle mushrooms and cipollini onions are worth the splurge, but you can substitute halved cremini mushrooms and frozen pearl onions and the results will still be very tasty.

Recipe: Green Beans with Chanterelles and Cipollini

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Fried Green Beans and Shallot Rings

The beans will cook tender-crisp in the same time it takes to brown the coating.

Recipe: Fried Green Beans and Shallot Rings

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Roasted Long Beans with Herb Butter

You can make this dish with regular green beans, but long beans look more handsome.

Recipe: Roasted Long Beans with Herb Butter

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Garlic and Thyme Green Beans

Sometimes the simplest of recipes are the most delicious. Plenty of garlic, some thyme, and really fresh green beans add up to more than the sum of their parts.

Recipe: Garlic and Thyme Green Beans

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Green Beans with Crisp Meyer Lemon Bread Crumbs

For an easy upgrade on steamed green beans, flavor fresh bread crumbs with a touch of Meyer lemon zest and create a quick dressing with the citrus juice.

Recipe: Green Beans with Crisp Meyer Lemon Bread Crumbs

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Brussels Sprouts with Chestnuts and Bacon

Chestnuts are the quintessential holiday ingredient. Serving them with this popular vegetable and everyone’s favorite meat is a sure way to win devoted fans.

Recipe: Brussels Sprouts with Chestnuts and Bacon

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Spicy Brussels Sprouts with Fried Capers

This quick recipe for piquant brussels will save precious time this Thanksgiving, without sacrificing on taste.

Recipe: Spicy Brussels Sprouts with Fried Capers

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Warm Brussels Sprout Leaves with Toasted Garlic and Lemon

These brussels sprouts are just 34 calories per serving, making them a healthy addition to your Thanksgiving meal. You need only a splash of oil on the leaves because you cook them quickly, like a warm salad, and they stay crisp.

Recipe: Warm Brussels Sprout Leaves with Toasted Garlic and Lemon

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Brussels Sprouts with Parmesan and Pine Nuts

Parmesan cheese and crunchy pine nuts will make a Brussels sprouts lover even out of those self-professed haters.

Recipe: Brussels Sprouts with Parmesan and Pine Nuts

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Shaved Brussels Sprouts with Pancetta

Tender, thinly shaved Brussels sprouts are sautéed with salty, crispy pancetta in this simple, crowd-pleasing side dish.

Recipe: Shaved Brussels Sprouts with Pancetta

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Roasted Broccolini With Almond Parsley Pesto

Broccolini is glorious roasted, and even more delicious with this hearty, unusual pesto. You can sub in roasted regular broccoli if you'd like.

Recipe: Roasted Broccolini With Almond Parsley Pesto

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Roasted Broccolini

Leggy, small-flowered broccolini is a hybrid of regular broccoli and Chinese broccoli. It’s great steamed, but glorious roasted: The color and flavor deepen, and the florets get delectably crisp—almost as though they’ve been fried. Roasted regular broccoli is also delicious, though it won’t get quite as crisp.

Recipe: Roasted Broccolini

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Roasted Chile-Lime Broccolini

Ancho chile powder and lime coat roasted broccolini, and stays crisp even if made a day ahead.

Recipe: Roasted Chile-Lime Broccolini

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Roasted Broccoli

Roasting, as opposed to steaming, deepens the flavor and color of broccoli, and makes it a nice change from familiar steamed broccoli.

Recipe: Roasted Broccoli

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Broccoli Romanesco with Green Herb Sauce

Whorled broccoli romanesco is an exotic treat, yet it’s very easy to prepare—just steam until tender. If you can’t find small heads, just break a full-grown head into florets (cauliflower works too). This recipe is adapted from one in Vegetable Literacy (Ten Speed Press, 2013), by Deborah Madison.

Recipe: Broccoli Romanesco with Green Herb Sauce

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Roasted Cauliflower and Shallots with Chard and Dukkah

The secret ingredient in this dish, inspired by one served by chef Matthew Dillon at the Corson Building in Seattle, is an easy-to-make Egyptian nut-and-spice blend called dukkah. Add protein-rich chickpeas for a more filling version.

Recipe: Roasted Cauliflower and Shallots with Chard and Dukkah

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Roasted Cauliflower with Capers

Instead of baking cauliflower in a classic cream sauce, we’ve sliced it thinly and roasted it (with very little fat) to get a nicely toasted flavor–and keep it just shy of 40 calories per serving.

Recipe: Roasted Cauliflower with Capers

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Roasted Delicata Squash with Honey, Pomegranate Seeds, and Pepitas

The skin of delicata squash is tender when roasted and very flavorful, so try it along with the flesh.

Recipe: Roasted Delicata Squash with Honey, Pomegranate Seeds, and Pepitas

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Chile-roasted Acorn Squash

You can eat these spicy-sweet, soft wedges skin and all, making them a no-fuss addition to your holiday meal.

Recipe: Chile-roasted Acorn Squash

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Glazed Carrots and Pecans

Tender carrots and crunchy pecans get tossed in a sweet brown sugar and ginger glaze for a quick side dish that's easy and delicious.

Recipe: Glazed Carrots with Pecans

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Wilted Red Cabbage with Mint

Wilting the cabbage briefly brings out its color and flavor, and softens it. This recipe is based on one in Deborah Madison’s book Vegetable Literacy (Ten Speed Press, 2013). She likes to add small mint leaves right before serving—they’re aromatic and cheerful.

Recipe: Wilted Red Cabbage with Mint

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Jumble of Sweet-and-Sour Onions

Like cranberries, this colorful medley of small onions adds a sweet-tart note to a Thanksgiving dinner. Deborah Madison created this recipe for us based on one in her book Vegetable Literacy (Ten Speed Press, 2013), and she vastly prefers small, regular shallots (about the size of a walnut in its shell) to the supersize ones. The small type are firmer and blend better with the other onions.

Recipe: Jumble of Sweet-and-Sour Onions

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Mild white Japanese turnips are cooked with their greens along with white miso and butter for savory richness; maple syrup adds a touch of sweetness. If you can’t find Japanese turnips, use a mix of small radishes and mustard greens—regular turnips are too strong for this dish.

Recipe: Japanese Turnips with Maple-Miso Butter

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